Andrew E. Dessler (2012, 2015) Introduction to Modern Climate Change, 2 ed.

  • Andrew E. Dessler, 2012: Introduction to Modern Climate Change. Cambridge University Press, 238 pp. ISBN 978-0-521-17315-5 (pbk.)[読書メモ]
  • Andrew E. Dessler, (2012), 2015: Introduction to Modern Climate Change, Second Edition. Cambridge University Press, 273 pp. ISBN 978-1-107-09682-0 (hardcover), 978-1-107-48067-4 (paperback, eTextbook)

地球温暖化についての自然科学を主とした総論的な大学の授業の教科書。

Dessler & Parson “The Science and Politics of Global Climate Change” の第3版が出た機会にそちらを見てみたのだが、自然科学者のわたしがやる授業の参考としては、Dessler “Introduction to Modern Climate Change[初版の読書メモ]のほうがよさそうだと思った。こちらの最新版は2015年に出た第2版だ。

初版と第2版の目次をつきあわせてみた。目次に見られるかぎりの項目の変化はすくない。政治の動きに関する第13章の終わりちかくが現実の進展に応じて書きかえられている。政策論の第14章のはじめに「なぜ気候変化はむずかしい問題なのか」という節がくわえられている。

しかし、初版が出たあとの2013-14年にIPCCの第5次評価報告書が出たから、それにあわせてあちこちの章で材料がさしかえられている。

また、全体のページ数がふえている。そして、第2版にはあちこちに「aside」とか「example」のかこみ記事がある。初版にもあったかどうか、まだ確認していないのだが、おそらく、初版で授業をしてみて補足したほうがよいと思ったことを第2版で追加したのだと思う。

文献

  • Andrew E. Dessler & Edward A. Parson, (2006, 2010) 2020: The Science and Politics of Global Climate Change — A Guide to the Debate. Third Edition. Cambridge University Press. ISBN 978-1-107-17942-4 (hardcover), 978-1-316-63132-4 (paperback).

折りかえしのあとに くわしい目次をつける。Kindle版にもとづいて書きぬいたものだ。初版からの変更点が見えるようにした。角かっこ([…])でかこんだ項目は第2版のかこみ記事で、初版にもあったかどうかはまだ確認していない。各章末の「…」としたところは「Additional reading / Terms / Problems」である。

== 目次 ==
Contents
Preface
Acknowledgments
1. An introduction to the climate problem
– 1.1 What is climate?
– 1.2 What is climate change?
– 1.3 A coordinate system for the Earth
– 1.4 Why you should believe this textbook
– – [An aside: The Summary for Policymakers]
– – [An aside: But I still don’t trust the IPCC]
– 1.5 Chapter summary / Additional reading / Terms / Problems
2. Is the climate changing?
– 2.1 Recent climate change
– – 2.1.1 Surface thermometer record
– – [An aside: Has global warming stopped?]
– – 2.1.2 Satellite measurements of temperature
– – 2.1.3 Ice
– – – 2.1.3.1 Glaciers
– – – 2.1.3.2 Sea ice
– – – 2.1.3.3 Ice sheets
– – 2.1.4 Ocean temperatures
– – 2.1.5 Sea level
– – 2.1.6 Putting it all together: Is today’s climate changing?
– – 2.1.7 What is not evidence of climate change
– 2.2 Climate over the Earth’s history
– – 2.2.1 Paleoproxies
– – 2.2.2 The Earth’s long-term climate record
– – [An aside: What does the paleorecord tell us about how serious of a threat climate change is?]
– 2.3 Chapter summary / …
3. Radiation and energy balance
– 3.1 Temperature and energy
– – [An example: How much power does it take to run a human body?]
– 3.2 Electromagnetic radiation
– 3.3 Blackbody radiation
– – [An example: How fast is a room-temperature basketball losing energy by the emission of photons?]
– 3.4 Energy balance
– – [An example: conservation of money]
3.5 Chapter summary / …
4. A simple climate model
– 4.1 The source of energy for our climate system
– 4.2 Energy loss to space
– 4.3 The greenhouse effect
– – 4.3.1 One-layer model
– – 4.3.2 Two-layer model
– – 4.3.3 n-layer model
– 4.4 Testing our theory with other planets
– 4.5 Chapter summary / …
5. The carbon cycle
– 5.1 Greenhouse gases and our atmosphere’s composition
– 5.2 Atmosphere – land biosphere – ocean carbon exchange
– – 5.2.1 Atmosphere – land biosphere exchange
– – [An aside: Where does the oxygen in our atmosphere come from?]
– – 5.2.2 Atmosphere – ocean carbon exchange
– – 5.2.3 The combined atmosphere – land biosphere – ocean system
– 5.3 Atmosphere – rock exchange
– 5.4 How are humans perturbing the carbon cycle?
– – [An aside: How do we measure how much carbon is going into the ocean versus the land-biosphere?]
– 5.5 Some commonly asked questions about the carbon cycle
5.6 The long-term fate of carbon dioxide
5.65.7 Methane
5.75.8 Chapter summary / …
6. Forcing, feedbacks, and climate sensitivity
– 6.1 Time lags in the climate system
– 6.2 Radiative forcing
– – [An example: What is the radiative forcing of a 5 percent increase in solar constant for the Earth that occurs over 100 years?]
– – 6.2.1 Trace gases Greenhouse gases
– – 6.2.2 Aerosols
– – 6.2.3 Land-use changes
– – 6.2.4 Changes in the Sun
– – 6.2.5 Total net forcing
– 6.3 Feedbacks
– – 6.3.1 Fast feedbacks
– – 6.3.2 Slow feedbacks
– – [An aside: Feedback vs. radiative forcing]
– 6.4 Climate sensitivity
– – 6.4.1 Feedback math
– – 6.4.2 Sensitivity
– 6.5 Chapter summary / …
7. Why is the climate changing?
– 7.1 The first suspect: Movement of the continents Continental drift
– 7.2 The Sun
– 7.3 The Earth’s orbit
– 7.4 Internal variability
– 7.5 Greenhouse gases
– – [An aside: How does science deal with outliers?]
– – [An aside: A skeptical argument]
– 7.6 Putting it all together
– – [An aside: Evolution of the IPCC’s statements on warming]
– 7.7 Chapter summary / …
8. The future of our climate
– 8.1 The factors that control emissions
– – [An aside: Check the units!]
– 8.2 How these factors have changed in the recent past and how will they change in the future
– – 8.2.1 Population
– – 8.2.2 Affluence
– – 8.2.3 Technology
8.3 How these factors will change over the 21st century
– – 8.3.1 Population
– – 8.3.2 Affluence
– – 8.3.3 Technology
8.48.3 Emissions scenarios
– – [Summary of scenario families]
8.58.4 Predictions of future atmospheric composition
8.68.5 Predictions of future climate
– – 8.6.18.5.1 Over the next century
– – [An aside: Will the evolution of the climate over the twenty-first century look like the trajectories plotted in Figure 8.5?]
– – 8.6.28.5.2 Climate change beyond 2100
8.78.6 Is the climate predictable?
8.88.7 Chapter summary / …
9. Impacts of climate change
– 9.1 Why should you care about climate change?
9.2 Physical impacts
– – 9.29.2.1 Temperature
– – 9.39.2.2 Precipitation
– – 9.49.2.3 Sea-level rise and ocean acidification
– – 9.2.4 Loss of ice
– – 9.2.5 Extreme events
9.59.3 Impact of these changes
– – [An aside: What are ecosystem services?]
9.69.4 Abrupt climate changes
9.79.5 Chapter summary / …
10. Exponential growth
– 10.1 What is exponential growth?
– 10.2 The rule of 72
– 10.3 Limits of exponential growth
– 10.4 Discounting
– – 10.4.1 The time value of money
– – – [An example: What would you do?]
– – 10.4.2 The discount rate
10.5 Putting it together: The social cost of carbon
10.510.6 Chapter summary / …
11. Fundamentals of climate change policy
– 11.1 Adaptation
– 11.2 Mitigation
– – 11.2.1 Technology to reduce carbon intensity
– – 11.2.2 Policies to reduce carbon emissions
– 11.3 Geoengineering
– 11.4 Chapter summary / …
12. Mitigation policies
– 12.1 Conventional regulations
– 12.2 Market-based regulations
– – 12.2.1 Carbon tax
– – 12.2.2 Cap and trade
– – 12.2.3 Carbon tax versus cap and trade
– – 12.2.4 Offsets
– – [An aside: The European Trading System]
– 12.3 Information and voluntary methods
– 12.4 Chapter summary / …
13. A brief history of climate science and politics
– 13.1 The beginning of climate science
– 13.2 The emergence of environmentalism
– – 13.2.1 The tobacco strategy
– 13.3 The 1970s and 1980s: Supersonic airliners, acid rain, and ozone depletion
– 13.4 The year everything changed: 1988
– 13.5 The Framework Convention on Climate Change: The first climate treaty
– 13.6 The Kyoto Protocol
– 13.7 The George W. Bush years: 2001 – 2008
– 13.8 Copenhagen The Obama years: 2009 – today
13.9 The breakthrough: U.S.-China bilateral agreement
13.913.10 Chapter summary / …
14. Putting it together: A long-term policy to address climate change
14.1 What makes climate change such a difficult problem?
14.114.2 Decisions under uncertainty: Should we reduce emissions?
14.214.3 Picking a long-term goal
– – 14.2.114.3.1 Cost versus benefits
– – 14.2.214.3.2 Target: 2 degree C
14.314.4 How do we get there?
– – 14.3.114.4.1 The physics of a 2 degree C limit
– – 14.3.214.4.2 How to get there from here
– – 14.4.3 What policies should look like
– – 14.3.314.4.3 (sic) What can you do?
14.414.5 A few final thoughts / …
References
Index

コメントを残す

メールアドレスが公開されることはありません。 * が付いている欄は必須項目です

このサイトはスパムを低減するために Akismet を使っています。コメントデータの処理方法の詳細はこちらをご覧ください